Friday, June 11, 2010

I Can Explain

It's a perfectly logical conclusion to the beginning of my quest for a Native American funeral song.

It's been over ten years, but still, I search for a song that I have only heard once before. I only know that it is a song for the dead and is sung by a woman with such emotion, while a drum beats slowly in the background. I am haunted by her as much as Detective McPherson was for Laura.

So, I search...

I did find a beautiful song by Walela, which means 'hummingbird' in the Cherokee language. Rita Coolidge formed the band with her sister and niece in 1997. I had never heard of Walela, but I have heard of Coolidge and have admired her fabulous cheekbones which were begotten with Scottish and Cherokee blood.

Another Shameful American History Lesson, Here ->In the 1800's, Native Americans were forced to walk the 'Trail of Tears' or as the white folk called it "Indian removal" As other tribes were moved to the Oklahoma reservations, the Cherokee went to the Supreme Court, who did agree to allow the Cherokee to remain on their chosen land. However, Andrew Jackson had other ideas and he sent an army to forcibly remove them. Because it was in the dead of winter and they were ill prepared for the march, thousands died along the trail.

*Sidebar: Coolidge went to Andrew Jackson High School in Jacksonville, Fl.

In the summer of xx, I fell in love with Rita and Boz Scaggs. I listened to 'We're All Alone' hundreds of times and I cannot say if an 8-track was involved. It's getting blurry._._._

The Walker Brothers did a beautiful version of the song, too, but I don't really care.

The Brothers also sing, 'The sun ain't gonna shine anymore.' and so did Juliet Stevenson and Alan Rickman in one of my most favorite movies. It's a chick flick- a twenty hanky weeper.

Aah, Alan...

Baaaaby, baby...

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